Filtering by Tag: NYC

4 exhibitions, 4 projects, 4 countries!

Added on by Annie Ling.

It's often said that once you put your work out there, it begin to have a life of their own. Without the support of those who believe in our work, we would truly never be able to give our work the audience it deserves. So a big shout out and thank you to everyone behind these exhibitions!

Three personal projects spanning ten years are concurrently on view in three countries—Iceland, Latvia, Hungary, and a fourth exhibition is on its way here at home in NYC! I'm thrilled to announced an upcoming group show I'm privilege to be part of along with Thomas Holton and An Rong Xu opening next month at The Museum of the City of New York:

Upcoming Exhibition: 

INTERIOR LIVES: CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHS OF CHINESE NEW YORKERS
CMNY. Manhattan, NY, USA
Group exhibition coming soon: October 26, 2018 - March 24, 2019

Current Exhibitions:

OPEN HOUSE: MOMENTS FROM THE LIFE OF ASYLUM SEEKERS IN ICELAND
Gerðuberg Culture House. Reykjavik, Iceland
Solo exhibition on view now: May 4 - *extended* till September 16, 2018

INFINITE SAUVAGE: ISSP 2018 EXHIBITION IN KULDĪGA SAVVAĻA
Kuldīgas Mākslas Nams. Kuldiga, Latvia
Group exhibition on view now: August 4 - September 9, 2018

AWHERENESS: HUMAN TRAFFICKING IN ROMANIA AND MOLDOVA
Grand Cafe. Szeged, Hungary
Solo exhibition on view now: August 11 - September 30, 2018

Two exhibition openings tomorrow: New York City / Ólafsfjörður

Added on by Annie Ling.

Friends, it's my pleasure to invite you to the opening tomorrow of two groups shows I'm excited to be part of. I'll be in Ólafsfjörður but will celebrate in spirit in NYC also, with my project Awhereness in the company of strong works by women photographers who are dear friends and colleagues. Don't miss it!

In NYC:
Take Ten
School at ICP, 1114 Avenue of the Americas, New York, New York
On View: January 17–March 15, 2015
Opening Reception: January 16 | Friday | 6 pm
Ten photographers, all alumnae of the School at ICP's Full-Time Programs, tackle critical issues facing women and children today, from sex trafficking in Eastern Europe to child beauty contests, racial identity, personal loss, and digital identities.

In Ólafsfjörður:
Skammdegishátíð 2015
Listhús í Fjallabyggð Gallery, Ægisgata 625, Ólafsfjörður, Iceland
On View: January 17-25, 2015 | 5-8 pm Every Thursday to Sunday
Opening Reception:
16 January | 8-11 pm
Listhus artists in residence present a multi-disciplinary exhibition of work created during the dark winter, featuring individual reflections on local encounters, mysterious landscapes and indoor living in North Iceland.

Conversations w/ Asian American Writers' Workshop

Added on by Annie Ling.

So often, we don't take enough time to discuss our process or share openly what we've learned through all the ups and downs. Few weeks ago, I was "cornered" by some friendly folks from Asian American Writers' Workshop (AAWW).
Ashok Kondabolu of Das Racist visited me on my home turf and we had a good long conversation about photography, justice, Chinatown, roots, and fires. Read the interview on The Margins.

Coincidently, Kyla Cheung from Open City Magazine published a cohesive article online about my work with tenement dwellers and Chinese immigrant workers, bringing to light past histories, the present, and the uncertain future of my friends at 81 Bowery.

81 Bowery has been the subject of coverage by the Village Voice, the New York Times and CNN. The segment aired by CNN this past March on living conditions there led a concerned viewer from Arizona to call the FDNY, which then issued a vacate order citing “fire egress” and “sprinkler issues.” Ten minutes of interviews and footage left the approximately fifty residents of 81 Bowery scrambling to find a bed with friends, relatives, the Red Cross, or the Housing Preservation and Development (HPD). Most were Chinese immigrant workers, some undocumented.
— http://opencitymag.com/81-bowery-tenement/

The New York Times have been a great supporter of my personal work in Chinatown, featuring 81 Bowery in 2011 and most recently, in March on the New York Times LENS blog. On March 7th, long-time tenants of 81 Bowery were ordered to vacate the premises due to safety violations.   

It is with greatest disappointment that my friends at 81 Bowery are still in limbo, unable to return to their homes on the Bowery, with no promise of change or improvements made on living conditions in the near future. Meanwhile, I'd run into some of the former 81 Bowery residents hanging around Chinatown, and he/she would offer a warm hello followed by a question: "Do you know when I can go home?" I would shake my head and tell them that I do not have an answer, but that their advocates at CAAAV are working diligently on their behalf.

Sharing another one's story is a privilege that must be handled delicately. As storytellers, we must be vulnerable as well – to express our motivations and engage in conversations to better understand who we are and where we stand, especially if we find ourselves in the position of being a voice for those in need of a voice. 

 Chin Tu Yu in cubicle #6 at 81 Bowery packed a few possessions in the final minutes before vacating the building the evening of March 7th. Tu Yu Chin just arrived in US one month ago to join her husband who she hasn't seen in eight years. Chin currently works long hours at a laundromat in Chinatown. ©Annie Ling

Chin Tu Yu in cubicle #6 at 81 Bowery packed a few possessions in the final minutes before vacating the building the evening of March 7th. Tu Yu Chin just arrived in US one month ago to join her husband who she hasn't seen in eight years. Chin currently works long hours at a laundromat in Chinatown. ©Annie Ling

Awhereness Photo Exhibition Opening

Added on by Annie Ling.

I am honored finally to share this work with you. My project partner Patricia Chabvepi (Romanian-born human rights activist) and I warmly invite you to the New York photo exhibition opening of AWHERENESS, a collaborative work with survivors of trafficking in Romania and Moldova, this Thursday, April 25th, 7pm @ All Things Project Space on 269 Bleecker St.

Awhereness_PROMO_Email.jpg

About AWHERENESS: 

Romania and Moldova are beautiful countries with an ugly problem. Every year, thousands of women, men and children are trafficked outside and within the borders for sex and forced labor. 

We met many survivors of human trafficking who share similar histories. In most cases, children and young adults turn to the streets to escape harsh conditions at overrun orphanages or domestic abuse at home. Survivors are often exploited by those closest to them, such as a family member, partner, or lover. Psychological manipulation, coercion, and physical violence form the basis for a majority of these stories. 

Human trafficking is rooted in various systems of oppression. Hearing these stories, it is impossible to understand and address human trafficking without addressing broader socio-economic realities, gender inequality, domestic violence, corruption, racism, and poverty. 

Trafficking in Romania has swelled since 1989, with the end of communism. Upon joining the European Union in 2007, Romania relaxed its border patrol measures, which exacerbated the problem. The situation is even more critical in Moldova due to the rise of orphanages amidst a declining economy and lack of employment opportunities in the country. 

Awhereness is a collaboration with trafficked survivors to trace their stories and expose the places that enable trafficking. Trafficking is pervasive, making it hard to detect. It takes on many different forms, often in the most mundane places: at home, parks, transportation hubs, and beyond.

Where I'm From / Immigrant Heritage Week

Added on by Annie Ling.

Tomorrow, I will take part in an exciting new project coinciding with Immigrant Heritage Week:

Where I'm From is a project of the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism‘s radio program. “This is a natural extension of CUNY’s effort to develop new voices in public media. Part of doing that is developing new audiences and conscientiously serving and including them,” explains Tina Pamintuan, the J-School’s radio program director.

To kick off this pilot radio show focused on diaspora communities, I will be discussing and sharing a selection of my work in New York's Chinatown with esteemed host Jesse Hardman in front of a live audience at historic Webster Hall.

Where I'm From "will present a range of guests, essayists, and performers–including journalist and immigration advocate Jose Antonio Vargas, Kinshasa-born musician Isaac Katalay and his “Lifelong Project” band, and Annie Ling, whose photographic work of Manhattan Chinatown’s tenement housing was recently featured in the New York Times." 

Tickets can be purchased in advance for $5 here.

In the meantime, a teaser filmed this week by Nabil Rahman, in anticipation of the show:

The Art of Roommating / This week in NY Mag

Added on by Annie Ling.

This was truly one of my favorite assignments to date. In less than a week, I met over two dozen individuals sharing space in six different neighborhoods throughout NYC. It was a blast working with such a variety of people and situations: a house of aspiring actors, couples sharing space with other couples, an unlikely pair of seniors, a Jewish student housing community/kibbutz, a drag queen coupled with an art director, and so on...

Usually, I'm asked to work digitally but in this case, the wonderful editors at New York Magazine encouraged me to use film (a medium I often favor for personal projects).

Thanks to the genius and hard work of my editors Roxanne Behr and Jody Quon who put this all together, and Jhoanna Robledo for writing this fun and insightful piece.

Here are some of my favorite outtakes including extras from more roommate shoots while on assignment.

See it online here.

A false identity conviction

Added on by Annie Ling.

Today's cover story for the Sunday Metropolitan section in The New York Times features a sorted academic tale that ends in false identity conviction. Read the full article here. It's quite a fascinating read. Also, great reporting by John Leland.

I met the convicted Raphael Golb in his cluttered West Village apartment a week after the state supreme court handed down a decision to sentence Golb to six months in prison. A week later, I photographed Lawrence H. Schiffman, the prime target of Golb’s online activities, in Schiffman's office at Yeshiva University.

Below are published images and selected outtakes from both shoots.