Filtering by Tag: chinatown

Tribeca/Chinatown NYC pop-up show: "Between Here and Home"

Added on by Annie Ling.

Over the years, my work with immigrant communities and refugees dove into the nuances of home and identity in flux. Unsurprisingly perhaps, these themes have long marked my own journey of displacement and loss. When the opportunity came to participate in a pop-up group exhibition aptly named "Between Here and Home",  I decided it was time to unveil new work that resulted from recent attempts to dig deeper into my personal experience. And so, I'm pleased to present never before seen images from my recent travels along the Silk Road in China, along with an installation of diaristic 16mm and Super 8mm films from NYC. Please stop by, otherwise I hope we'll get a chance to connect another way in person.

From the series:  Double Take . 2016. Chromogenic prints. ©Annie Ling

From the series: Double Take. 2016. Chromogenic prints. ©Annie Ling

Between Here and Home | curated by Alan Chin
December 12, 2017 - January 7, 2018
384 Broadway, New York, NY

Opening Reception: Friday, December 15, 6 - 9pm

Exhibition Open Hours: 
Tuesday - Wednesday, 10am - 4pm
Thursday - Friday, 10am - 7pm
Saturday - Sunday, 2 - 7pm
Closed for Christmas, New Year's Eve, and New Year's Day.

What does it mean to be Chinese in the contemporary moment of technological transformation as well as dangerous nationalist imagery? In Between Here and Home, seven photographers — one Chinese, three American-born-Chinese, one who emigrated to Queens from China as a young child, a Taiwanese Canadian, and a Filipina who has worked in Hong Kong — share their perspectives on various aspects of Chinese life and culture, both in China and in the diaspora, including New York City’s Chinatowns. They document traditional communities facing tremendous change, personal journeys of discovery, and political conflict. 

"A Floating Population" in Fast Co. Design & Epsilon Magazine

Added on by Annie Ling.

It's hard to believe we're already at the halfway mark of my first major solo exhibition "A Floating Population" since it opened at MOCA this past December. We've received remarkable enthusiasm and support both in the community and beyond for the show, which features around eighty images spanning four years of work in Chinatown. Through public programming, panel discussions and walking tours around the exhibition at the museum, we're able to engage audiences with this body of work in a richer and more dynamic way than ever before. What's especially exciting to me is that all new current exhibits at the museum ("Portraits of New York Chinatown" by Tomie Arai, and "The Lee Family Since 1888" show) are taking a closer look at contemporary Chinatown, making this a distinctly historical season for the museum and the neighborhood.

The show is up till April 13th, so I wholly encourage a visit to MOCA in Chinatown soon! In the meantime, thank you Fast Company Design, Epsilon Magazine (below) and countless visitors for highlighting the show thus far.

Photographing the Immigrant Experience in Chinatown

Added on by Annie Ling.

Please join us this Saturday evening, June 8th at Union Docs in Williamsburg where I will present a slideshow of my photographs and director Lynn Sachs will screen her film Your Day is My Night. Afterwards, photojournalist Alan Chin will host a Q&A. Beer and wine will be served.  

Shifting Lives: Photographing the Immigrant Experience in Chinatown
Director Lynne Sachs & Photographer Annie Ling
UNION DOCS,  322 Union Avenue, Brooklyn, New York
Saturday, June 8 7:30 p.m.  $9 suggested
 www.uniondocs.org

Stuart Klawans wrote this review in "The Nation" for the MoMA premiere of Sach's film:
Your Day is My Night is a strikingly handsome, meditative work: a mixture of reportage, dreams, memories and playacting which immerses you in an entire world that you might unknowingly pass on the corner of Hester Street, unable to guess what’s behind the fifth-floor windows."   

Should be a great event and crowd. Hope to see you there! 

Conversations w/ Asian American Writers' Workshop

Added on by Annie Ling.

So often, we don't take enough time to discuss our process or share openly what we've learned through all the ups and downs. Few weeks ago, I was "cornered" by some friendly folks from Asian American Writers' Workshop (AAWW).
Ashok Kondabolu of Das Racist visited me on my home turf and we had a good long conversation about photography, justice, Chinatown, roots, and fires. Read the interview on The Margins.

Coincidently, Kyla Cheung from Open City Magazine published a cohesive article online about my work with tenement dwellers and Chinese immigrant workers, bringing to light past histories, the present, and the uncertain future of my friends at 81 Bowery.

81 Bowery has been the subject of coverage by the Village Voice, the New York Times and CNN. The segment aired by CNN this past March on living conditions there led a concerned viewer from Arizona to call the FDNY, which then issued a vacate order citing “fire egress” and “sprinkler issues.” Ten minutes of interviews and footage left the approximately fifty residents of 81 Bowery scrambling to find a bed with friends, relatives, the Red Cross, or the Housing Preservation and Development (HPD). Most were Chinese immigrant workers, some undocumented.
— http://opencitymag.com/81-bowery-tenement/

The New York Times have been a great supporter of my personal work in Chinatown, featuring 81 Bowery in 2011 and most recently, in March on the New York Times LENS blog. On March 7th, long-time tenants of 81 Bowery were ordered to vacate the premises due to safety violations.   

It is with greatest disappointment that my friends at 81 Bowery are still in limbo, unable to return to their homes on the Bowery, with no promise of change or improvements made on living conditions in the near future. Meanwhile, I'd run into some of the former 81 Bowery residents hanging around Chinatown, and he/she would offer a warm hello followed by a question: "Do you know when I can go home?" I would shake my head and tell them that I do not have an answer, but that their advocates at CAAAV are working diligently on their behalf.

Sharing another one's story is a privilege that must be handled delicately. As storytellers, we must be vulnerable as well – to express our motivations and engage in conversations to better understand who we are and where we stand, especially if we find ourselves in the position of being a voice for those in need of a voice. 

 Chin Tu Yu in cubicle #6 at 81 Bowery packed a few possessions in the final minutes before vacating the building the evening of March 7th. Tu Yu Chin just arrived in US one month ago to join her husband who she hasn't seen in eight years. Chin currently works long hours at a laundromat in Chinatown. ©Annie Ling

Chin Tu Yu in cubicle #6 at 81 Bowery packed a few possessions in the final minutes before vacating the building the evening of March 7th. Tu Yu Chin just arrived in US one month ago to join her husband who she hasn't seen in eight years. Chin currently works long hours at a laundromat in Chinatown. ©Annie Ling

Where I'm From / Immigrant Heritage Week

Added on by Annie Ling.

Tomorrow, I will take part in an exciting new project coinciding with Immigrant Heritage Week:

Where I'm From is a project of the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism‘s radio program. “This is a natural extension of CUNY’s effort to develop new voices in public media. Part of doing that is developing new audiences and conscientiously serving and including them,” explains Tina Pamintuan, the J-School’s radio program director.

To kick off this pilot radio show focused on diaspora communities, I will be discussing and sharing a selection of my work in New York's Chinatown with esteemed host Jesse Hardman in front of a live audience at historic Webster Hall.

Where I'm From "will present a range of guests, essayists, and performers–including journalist and immigration advocate Jose Antonio Vargas, Kinshasa-born musician Isaac Katalay and his “Lifelong Project” band, and Annie Ling, whose photographic work of Manhattan Chinatown’s tenement housing was recently featured in the New York Times." 

Tickets can be purchased in advance for $5 here.

In the meantime, a teaser filmed this week by Nabil Rahman, in anticipation of the show: